hyperbole in i've been to the mountaintop

by on December 2, 2020

But I’m not concerned about that now. We have an opportunity to make America a better nation. One key principle to understand in metaphor criticism is that For when people get caught up with that which is right and they are willing to sacrifice for it, there is no stopping point short of victory. I'm delighted to see each of you here tonight in spite of a storm warning. (Yes) Somewhere I read (Yes) that the greatness of America is the right to protest for right. And I've looked over. King Jr. delivered this speech on April 3. The speech primarily concerns the Memphis Sanitation Strike.King … But I wouldn't stop there. But it really doesn't matter with me now, because I've been to the mountaintop. And I want to say tonight [Applause], I want to say tonight that I, too, am happy that I didn't sneeze. And that was the fact that there was a certain kind of fire that no water could put out. Did you know that? Well, I don't know what will happen now; we've got some difficult days ahead. [Applause] Let us develop a kind of dangerous unselfishness. 1-The Sick Nation Metaphor 2- The Jericho Road Metaphor 3-The Mountaintop/Promised Land Metaphor The Mountaintop/Promised Land Metaphor Metaphors Conclusion "Like anybody, I would like to live - a long life; longevity has its place. "I've Been to the Mountaintop" Speech Analysis During the 1960s, the fight for racial equality began to really pick up speed. [Recording interrupted] Now that question could have easily ended up in a philosophical and theological debate. Let us stand with a greater determination. "I've Been To The Mountaintop", by Martin Luther King Jr.Outside Sources: In the biography of Martin Luther King Jr, by The Official Website of the Nobel Peace Prize, his life and accomplishments are outlined. (All right) And they would throw us in, and old Bull would say, "Take 'em off." reveals King�s hope for the nation to become the promised land. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I've Been To The Mountain Top” speech is more of a promise from him to the African-Americans and all other people who were facing racial prejudice at the time that they will and they need to overcome these inequalities by joining forces with each other. It is no longer a choice between violence and nonviolence in this world; it's nonviolence or nonexistence. But I know, somehow, that only when it is dark enough can you see the stars. He kept the slaves fighting among themselves. (Yes) We just need to go around to these stores (Yes sir), and to these massive industries in our country (Amen), and say, "God sent us by here (All right) to say to you that you're not treating His children right. And we've had the plane protected and guarded all night.". Reflection on MLK’s “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop” This year at Hanley Elementary a kindergartener was hit by a car while she was walking home from school. That is where we are today. [Applause] Reverend Ralph Jackson, Billy Kyles; I could just go right on down the list, but time will not permit. Now we must kind of redistribute that pain. King Jr. delivered this speech on April 3rd 1968 at the Church of Through the speech “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop”, Martin Luther King Jr. wants to give hope to the audience. We aren't engaged in any negative protest and in any negative arguments with anybody. I read a few, but one of them I will never forget. (Amen) But it really doesn't matter with me now, because I've been to the mountaintop. Championing a nonviolent movement for social equality, Martin Luther King, Jr., became the catalyst for monumental change. [Applause], And another reason I'm happy to live in this period is that we have been forced to a point where we are going to have to grapple with the problems that men have been trying to grapple with through history, but the demands didn't force them to do it. I just If it means leaving work, if it means leaving school, be there. That's the question. And we'd just go on singing, "Over my head, I see freedom in the air." Before I knew it I had been stabbed by this demented woman. But it doesn’t matter with me now. As I listened to Ralph Abernathy and his eloquent and generous introduction and then thought about myself, I wondered who he was talking about. I've seen them so often. (Yes) Men for years now have been talking about war and peace. I had received one from the president and the vice president; I've forgotten what those telegrams said. (Yeah) [Applause] And if we are God's children, we don't have to live like we are forced to live. And you know, if I were standing at the beginning of time with the possibility of taking a kind of general and panoramic view of the whole of human history up to now, and the Almighty said to me, "Martin Luther King, which age would you like to live in?" [Applause] Be concerned about your brother. It And I’ve seen the Promised Land. And whenever men and women straighten their backs up, they are going somewhere, because a man can't ride your back unless it is bent. There are three main metaphors that King uses: This metaphor is used to portray King�s disgust with the state of a But I want to thank all of them, and I want you to thank them because so often preachers aren't concerned about anything but themselves. “We’ve got some difficult days ahead,” Martin Luther King, Jr., told an overflowing crowd in Memphis, Tennessee, on 3 April 1968, where the city’s sanitation workers were striking. (Yeah) And as I said to you the other night, Bull Connor didn't know history. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. And in spite of its magnificence, I wouldn't stop there. (Yeah) [Applause] And I don't mind. I read in the paper of your misfortune and of your suffering. You start out in Jerusalem, which is about twelve hundred miles, or rather, twelve hundred feet above sea level. (Yeah) [Applause], Now we're going to march again, and we've got to march again (Yeah), in order to put the issue where it is supposed to be (Yeah) [Applause] and force everybody to see that there are thirteen hundred of God's children here suffering (That's right), sometimes going hungry, going through dark and dreary nights wondering how this thing is going to come out. (All right), I would move on by Greece, and take my mind to Mount Olympus. They allowed me to read some of the mail that came in, and from all over the states and the world kind letters came in. But I … But we just went before the dogs singing, "Ain't gonna let nobody turn me around." And I've … But Jesus immediately pulled that question from midair and placed it on a dangerous curve between Jerusalem and Jericho. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. You see, the Jericho Road is a dangerous road. And He's allowed me to go up to the mountain. But it really doesn't matter with me now, because I've been to the mountaintop. God in Christ headquarters in Memphis. (Keep on), I would even come up to the day of the Renaissance and get a quick picture of all that the Renaissance did for the cultural and aesthetic life of man. Martin Luther King, Jr.: Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. [Applause], And also, in the human rights revolution, if something isn't done and done in a hurry to bring the colored peoples of the world out of their long years of poverty; their long years of hurt and neglect, the whole world is doomed. “But it really doesn’t matter with me now, because I’ve been to the mountaintop … I’ve seen the Promised Land. Like anybody, I would like to live a long life. At points he wanted to trick Jesus (That's right), and show him that he knew a little more than Jesus knew and throw him off base. (Amen) Nothing would be more tragic than to stop at this point in Memphis. (All right), Strangely enough, I would turn to the Almighty and say, "If you allow me to live just a few years in the second half of the twentieth century, I will be happy." (Yeah) [Applause], I would come on up even to 1863 and watch a vacillating president by the name of Abraham Lincoln finally come to the conclusion that he had to sign the Emancipation Proclamation. They very seldom got around to mentioning the fact that 1,300 sanitation workers are on strike, and that Memphis is not being fair to them, and that Mayor Loeb is in dire need of a doctor. metaphors of a given artifact and show how these specific metaphors are not [Applause] Now these are some practical things that we can do. And by the time you get down to Jericho fifteen or twenty minutes later, you're about twenty-two feet below sea level. After you leave the United States, Soviet Russia, Great Britain, West Germany, France, and I could name the others, the American Negro collectively is richer than most nations of the world. (Yeah) At other times we would speculate that there was a religious law that one who was engaged in religious ceremonials was not to touch a human body twenty-four hours before the ceremony. [Applause]. If I had sneezed, I wouldn't have been in Memphis to see a community rally around those brothers and sisters who are suffering. (Yes) Go by the savings and loan association. And I’ve looked over. But I'm not concerned about that now. (Yeah) We are saying [Applause], we are saying that we are God's children. Start studying I've Been to the Mountaintop. [Laughter] That's a possibility. We need all of you. [Applause continues] Like anybody, I would like to live a long life—longevity has its place. (Yes) Now about injunctions. Fifty years ago this week, the Rev. All we say to America is to be true to what you said on paper. And then I got into Memphis. You know, whenever Pharaoh wanted to prolong the period of slavery in Egypt, he had a favorite, favorite formula of doing it. It balances By the hundreds we would move out, and Bull Connor would tell them to send the dogs forth, and they did come. And He’s allowed me to go up to the mountain. You reveal that you are determined [Audience:] (Right) to go on anyhow. The next minute I felt something beating on my chest. The question is, "If I do not stop to help the sanitation workers, what will happen to them?" We want to have an "insurance-in." (All right). [Applause] You have six or seven black insurance companies here in the city of Memphis. But I'm not concerned about that now. We have an injunction and we're going into court tomorrow morning (Go ahead) to fight this illegal, unconstitutional injunction. “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop,” Dr. King’s Last Sermon Annotated By NIKITA STEWART APRIL 2, 2018 On April 3, 1968, the Rev. This speech was given the day before We don't need any bricks and bottles; we don't need any Molotov cocktails. [Laughter, applause] But that day is all over. In this case, indirect references and direct references are the predominant language device used by the speaker, so you can find many examples in the speech. It balances the first two metaphors by seeing the nation not just by its problems, but by its potential. If we were Methodist or some others, we had been sprinkled. The issue is the refusal of Memphis to be fair and honest in its dealings with its public servants, who happen to be sanitation workers. metaphors "prescribe how to act" and give the audience the proper (Go ahead) It really doesn't matter what happens now. Because I’ve been to the mountaintop. [Applause] And when we have our march, you need to be there. (All right) But I wouldn't stop there. (Yeah) And as soon as we got on that road I said to my wife, "I can see why Jesus used this as the setting for his parable." (Yeah)[Applause] Tell them not to buy–what is the other bread?–Wonder Bread. [Applause] But whenever the slaves get together, something happens in Pharaoh's court, and he cannot hold the slaves in slavery.

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hyperbole in i've been to the mountaintop